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GDOT asks drivers to be safe this Halloween

GDOT asks drivers to be safe this Halloween

ATLANTA -- Whether you're taking children trick-or-treating or simply trying to get home at the end of a long workday, the Georgia Department of Transportation wants you to be safe this Halloween.

GDOT is offering advice for both drivers and pedestrians as the streets fill with young ghosts and goblins this evening.

Drivers are asked to slow down when entering neighborhoods and school zones. Reduce the number of distractions in the car, like phones and music, and take an extra second to look for children on medians and curbs.

GDOT also recommends driving with headlights on; that makes it easier to spot children from far away.

Young trick-or-treaters should look left, right and left again while trying to cross the street. They should also always stay on sidewalks or paths, and should not dart into the road or try to cross it from between parked cars.

It is recommended that children wear reflective tape or apply it to their trick-or-treat bags.

6 ways to save On Halloween decorations

6 ways to save On Halloween decorations

ATLANTA -- Every year there are millions of dollars spent on Halloween, from costumes, snacks and candy to decorations.

Hopefully after reading this, you will be able to save a ton on Halloween decor for your yard and home.

Pure Tennis offering group lessons for kids

Pure Tennis offering group lessons for kids

ATLANTA -- Pure Tennis will hold clinics for local kids next month.

The lessons will run from Apr. 15 to June 3, and will be held at the Grant Park Tennis Courts for children in Glenwood Park, Grant Park, Ormewood Park and the surrounding communities.

The sessions are geared toward children aged 3-14. The registration deadline is Monday, Apr. 8.

Visit puretennis.net for more information or to sign up.

The Autism Gap: The fight for insurance

The Autism Gap: The fight for insurance

ATLANTA -- Eight year old Ava Bullard is playing with her sisters, riding their bikes on their long country driveway. It is a simple act that defies those who said she would never talk, those who said she wouldn't function in the real world.

Ava was not a typical baby, or toddler.

Her mother Anna says, "You couldn't interact with her."

MORE | Complete coverage of The Autism Gap

Ava did not play with toys. Did not speak. Could not dress herself. Did not interact with her parents or sisters. Slept two hours a night. She was in her own world.

Anna says, "It's like she looked straight through me. She would just...it's like you weren't there, if you were in the room with her."

Anna Bullard took Ava from doctor to doctor for months. One doctor told the family Ava was 'just weird.'

Fulton Health and Human Services opens One-of-a-Kind Facility

Fulton Health and Human Services opens One-of-a-Kind Facility

ATLANTA -- The newly renovated Oak Hill Child, Adolescent and Family Center, located at 2805 Metropolitan Parkway in Atlanta, officially re-opens Thursday, February 7 with a ribbon cutting ceremony at 10:00 a.m. The center sits on a 22-acre campus and will provide coordinated care to children and their families from all over Fulton County.

Reserve your time to see Santa

Reserve your time to see Santa

ATLANTA -- Santa Claus will return to this year's East Atlanta Santa Fest, and he's ready to pose for pictures with two-legged and four-legged creatures alike.

Pictures with East Atlanta Santa will be taken Saturday, Dec. 1 and Sunday, Dec. 2 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Joe's Coffee and Avenue Realty.

Reserve a time by sending your name and contact information to eavsanta@gmail.com. Reservations are booked in 10-minute increments; Saturday's slots are already full, but Santa may be able to squeeze in walk-ins if time allows. The cost is $15 and includes a CD of pictures. Proceeds benefit several local programs, including East Atlanta Kids Club, Atlanta Beagle Rescue and Atlanta Bully Rescue.

East Atlanta Santa Fest will be held Saturday, Dec. 1.

As Students End School Year, Boys & Girls Clubs Offers Way to Fight “Summer Brain Drain"

ATLANTA -- This month, millions of kids begin their summer breaks, looking forward to vacations, pool time and carefree days. But studies and experience show a lack of mental stimulation causes them to unlearn much of what they were taught over the school year.  Boys & Girls Clubs across the country offer young people a safe, exciting place to spend their summer months, with staff and resources to fight the effects of this “Summer Brain Drain.”

The reality for today’s kids is that many will find themselves with few structured activities, caregivers who are working all day, and too much unsupervised television, video game and computer time.

President Touts Concerns Over Summer Learning

Also known as “summer learning loss” or the “summer slide,” this issue is a growing problem for American children.  In 2010, President Obama noted, “Students are losing a lot of what they learn during the school year during the summer.”